Co‑production and Managing Uncertainty in Health Research Regulation: A Delphi Study

The results of our latest DELPHI study engaging stakeholders in health research regulation about possible reforms. There are some fascinating results about appeals to proportionality, public interest and the importance of co-production of regulation. The full open access article can be found here.

Katy McMillan blog with Journal of Medical Ethics ‘Alexa, does this look infected? – We need to talk about safely regulating the digitisation of healthcare, now.’

Katy McMillan’s most recent blog with Journal of Medical Ethics ‘Alexa, does this look infected? – We need to talk about safely regulating the digitisation of healthcare, now.’ Read it here:

Alexa, does this look infected? – We need to talk about safely regulating the digitisation of healthcare, now.

Fletcher coordinates session during Edinburgh International Science Festival ‘Should We Give Up Meat to Save the Planet?’

Should We Give Up Meat to Save the Planet?

Isabel Fletcher blogs a recap of ‘Should We All Give Up Eating Meat to Save the Planet?’, which was an event held recently in the Red Theatre at Summerhall as part of the Edinburgh International Science Festival (EISF) on the 6th April 2018.  Join us over at The Motley Coat, to read more.

Our food systems are a major cause of environmental damage, linked to greenhouse gas emissions, loss of biodiversity and deforestation. Researchers and policymakers are encouraging us to adopt sustainable diets, but how do we make the right choices? And should we – as suggested by recently published guidelines in Sweden and the Netherlands – be reducing meat and dairy as these have the greatest environmental impact? Or should we be supporting our farmers because, in the UK, livestock production is such an important part of our economy? Join us for presentations and discussion.Ticket price includes samples of three sustainable snacks provided Edinburgh Larder.

 

Liminal spaces colleagues publish latest article ‘Charting regulatory stewardship in health research: Making the invisible visible?’, Cambridge quarterly of healthcare ethics, Vol 27 (2018)

Abstract

This article analyses a hitherto largely obscured feature of regulatory environments in health research; namely, the role of regulatory stewardship. Through examples drawn from research ethics committees, emerging technologies, and governance of research resources, it outlines the essential features of regulatory stewardship, and argues that this concept can demonstrate considerable added value for all parties in delivering and benefiting from efficient and effective navigation of regulatory landscapes. It offers an exposition of the normative principles and associated responsibilities of the concept. The extant invisibility of regulatory stewardship requires fuller recognition and better integration of the approach into the effective functioning of law and regulation in the health research context.

‘Charting regulatory stewardship in health research: Making the invisible visible?’
Graeme Laurie, Edward S. Dove, Isabel Fletcher, Agomoni Ganguli-Mitra, Catriona McMillan, Nayha Sethi, Annie Sorbie, (2018) In: Cambridge quarterly of healthcare ethics, Vol 27, pp 333-347

Regulating for Uncertainty: 1-2nd February 2018: Wellcome Collection in London

The Liminal Spaces Team ran its second workshop at the Wellcome Collection in London on 1-2nd February, 2018. The overarching theme of the two day gathering was ‘Regulating for Uncertainty’ and the Team brought together a range of participants in order to gain insights into how we seek to respond to the challenges of health research regulation, across a variety of settings during times of flux. Three core themes (activities, actors and things) were explored across five panel sessions. The preliminary panel considered Liminality as a theoretical concept, inviting us to reflect, throughout the remainder of the workshop, how the concept might be of value (or not!) in practice. Next, a session on Global Health Emergencies considered what lessons we might learn from research and response in disaster settings, which are notoriously sights of uncertainty. The session on Margins and Beings examined the ways in which law can attempt to categorise constantly evolving objects of regulation (such as embryos)  and the potential implications of doing so. Next, we focussed on Research/Treatment/Innovation and the challenges which emerge given the increasing overlap between these activities. The final panel turned to identify what responsibilities might lie with regulators in attempting to guide various actors, activities and thing across liminal spaces. The workshop findings will inform the future work of the Liminal Spaces Project. 
The workshop report can be found here.